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Low eosinophil count in the blood

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Low eosinophil count in the blood
Last update: 04/03/2021

What is a low count of eosinophils in the blood called?

  • Eosinopenia

What is the normal count of eosinophils in the blood?

If you need to know which are the eosinophils reference ranges or you require more information about the role of eosinophils in the blood, you can visit normal eosinophil count in the blood

What does a low count of eosinophils in the blood mean?

A decreased in circulating eosinophils in the blood is called eosinopenia and it is not usually a matter for concern. In many labs, values near zero are considered to be in the normal range.

Eosinophils are a type of WBC (White Blood Cells) and if the total WBC count is also low may suggest a bone marrow disorder because the blood cells are produced by the bone marrow.

Eosinopenia is usually caused by an increased adrenal steroid production that accompanies most conditions of bodily stress and is associated with:

  • Cushing’s syndrome.
  • Use of certain drugs such as ACTH, epinephrine.
  • Acute bacterial infections.

Eosinopenia or a low eosinophil count in the blood means:

  • Mild eosinopenia (0 - 50 /µl in adults):

    A mild eosinopenia is not a matter to be worried about and probably they return to normal range in future tests.

    If eosinophil count remains low, the main reasons may be medication (corticosteroids), Cushing’s syndrome or typhoid fever.

    Alcohol intake may also reduce the eosinophil count in the blood.

Which factors can decrease the eosinophil count in the blood?

Some particular health situation and drugs may reduce your eosinophil count in the blood:

  • Alcohol
  • Vigorous exercise
  • Stress
  • Surgical Intervention
  • Burns
  • Drugs
    • Antiarrhythmic agents
      • Procainamide
    • Catecholamine
      • Epinephrine
    • Corticosteroids
    • Glucocorticoids
      • Adrenocorticotropic hormone
    • Insulins
    • Niacinamide
    • Niacin

Which diseases can decrease your eosinophil count in the blood?

The following diseases can explain an eosinophil count in the blood lower than normal:

  • Typhoid fever
  • Cushing's syndrome
  • Myocardial infarction

What can I do to increase the eosinophil count in the blood?

Alcohol intake may reduce the eosinophil count. For this reason, a good tip is to cut down on the daily alcohol consumption.

Stress can also reduce the eosinophil count so you can need therapy to try to solve it.

Finally, the main reason for eosinopenia is taking corticosteroids. If you are taking them, you can visit your doctor to know if it is possible to lower the daily dosage.

Where can I find more information about eosinophil count in the blood?

You can visit our pages about:

Which values are considered a low eosinophil count in the blood?

The following values are considered to be above the normal range:

IMPORTANT: These levels are expressed in number /µl (microliter). They are an example of a healthy white man/woman of about 45 years old with no known disease and not taking any medication. The ranges can be different depending on the laboratory or on your personal circumstances.

Eosinophils
Mild eosinopenia
49 /µl48 /µl47 /µl46 /µl45 /µl44 /µl43 /µl42 /µl
41 /µl40 /µl39 /µl38 /µl37 /µl36 /µl35 /µl34 /µl
33 /µl32 /µl31 /µl30 /µl29 /µl28 /µl27 /µl26 /µl
25 /µl24 /µl23 /µl22 /µl21 /µl20 /µl19 /µl18 /µl
17 /µl16 /µl15 /µl14 /µl13 /µl12 /µl11 /µl10 /µl
9 /µl8 /µl7 /µl6 /µl5 /µl4 /µl3 /µl2 /µl
1 /µl0 /µl      
Medically reviewed by our Medical staff on 04/03/2021

Bibliography

  • Concise Book of Medical Laboratory Technology: Methods and Interpretations. 2nd Edition. 2015. Ramnik Sood. ISBN: 978-93-5152-333-8. Pag. 260.
  • A Manual of Laboratory and Diagnostic Test. 9th edition. Frances Fischbach. Marshall B. Dunning III. 2014. Pag 75. ISBN-10: 1451190891.
  • Laboratory tests and diagnostic procedures with nursing diagnoses (8th ed), Jane Vincent Corbett, Angela Denise Banks, ISBN: 978-0-13-237332-6, Pag. 51.
  • Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Version 5.0.Published: November 27, 2017. U.S. Department of health and human Services. Available on: https://ctep.cancer.gov

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